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Polymyositis

Get the facts on Polymyositis treatment, diagnosis, staging, causes, types, symptoms. Information and current news about clinical trials and trial-related data, Polymyositis prevention, screening, research, statistics and other Polymyositis related topics. We answer all your qestions about Polymyositis.

Question: Where is the best treatment available for Polymyositis? Can anyone help me by providing information on hospitals in the US or anywhere else in the world where good treatment for Polymyositis is available?. Any help will be appreciated! Thanks!

Answer: Polymyositis is a type of inflammatory myopathy, related to dermatomyositis and inclusion body myositis. Polymyositis means 'many muscle inflammation'. Polymyositis tends to become evident in adulthood, presenting with bilateral proximal muscle weakness, often noted in the upper legs due to early fatigue while walking. Sometimes the weakness presents itself by the person being unable to rise from a seated position without help, or inability to raise their arms above their head. The weakness is generally progressive, accompanied by lymphocytic inflammation (mainly cytotoxic T8 lymphocytes). The cause is unknown, but seems to be related to autoimmune factors, genetics, and perhaps viruses. In rare cases, the cause is known to be infectious, associated with the pathogens that cause Lyme disease, toxoplasmosis, and others. Polymyositis, like dermatomyositis, strikes females with greater frequency than males. The skin involvement of dermatomyositis is absent in polymyositis. Diagnosis is fourfold, including elevation of creatine kinase, signs and symptoms, electromyograph (EMG) alteration, and a positive muscle biopsy. Treatment generally involves glucocorticoids, especially prednisone. Unfortunately very few in the medical profession are familiar enough with the disease to be able to accurately diagnose it in the early stages. Therefore many patients go undiagnosed for years, suffering needlessly. Sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM): IBM is often confused with (misdiagnosed as) polymyositis and polymyositis that does not respond to treatment is likely IBM. sIBM comes on over months to years, polymyositis comes on over weeks to months. It appears that sIBM and polymyositis share some common features, especially the initial sequence of immune system activation, however, polmyositis does not display the subsequent muscle degeneration and protein abnormalities as seen in IBM. As well, polymyositis tends to respond well to treatments, IBM does not. IBM and polymyositis apparently involve different disease mechanisms than are seen in dermatomyositis. The link below has some suggestions on treatments.


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